Think Tank 2015 Speakers

JamesSchickel_1 JAMES SCHICKEL, SGTMAJ, USMC (RET.), OIF COMBAT VETERAN
James is a 30-year Veteran of the Marine Corps and a 25-year veteran of law enforcement. James retired from the Marine Corps as a Sergeant Major and participated in numerous operations, throughout his career, including combat operations in Iraq. James reached the rank of Police Captain in the law enforcement community. James is currently employed with CalVet, and serves over one half million Veterans throughout Southern California, providing counsel to Veterans and their families. He currently serves as B.R.A.I.N.’s Veterans Affairs Advisor.
Todd Clements TODD CLEMENTS, M.D.
Dr. Clements is a board certified psychiatrist and Diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology. He is the author of Blue Genes, Is Your Brain Stopping You from Succeeding?, Happy Pills, and co-author of Who’s Crazy Now? Dr. Clements was chosen by the Consumers’ Research Council of America as one of the country’s top physicians in adolescent psychiatry in 2007 and 2008. He has been the national speaker at medical symposiums on brain injury. Dr. Clements currently serves as a board member of B.R.A.I.N.
ADoan ANDREW DOAN, M.D., PH.D. CDR MC USN
Dr. Andrew Doan is a recognized expert in technology and video game addiction. With a doctoral degree in neuroscience, his background in molecular neuroscience adds in depth knowledge into the areas of Internet Addiction, Video Game Addiction, and Technology Addiction. He spends 80% of his time in medical research as Head of Addictions & Resilience Research for the US Navy in the Department of Mental Health. Dr. Doan is the author of Hooked on Games, detailing his personal struggle with gaming addiction and the steps to take for gaming addicts to achieve recovery and the steps for families and loved ones to intervene.
JohnKelley JOHN KELLEY, CHAIR & CEO, CERESCAN
John Kelley is the Chair and CEO of CereScan, the leading functional brain diagnostics company in the country, headquartered in Denver, Colorado. Through high-definition brain SPECT imaging and patented data warehousing tools, doctors working with CereScan are able to evaluate blood flow in areas of the brain that are not performing properly. CereScan provides treating physicians with new and unique tools that aid in the detection and diagnosis of complex conditions such as Traumatic Brain Injury. Kelley says, “as CereScan’s brain diagnostic capabilities continue to increase in sophistication, doctors will have more science-based information which will enable them to more effectively treat brain disorders.” John served in the United States Army from 1970 to 1972 and now helps veterans through CereScan’s collaboration with leading doctors and charitable organizations from around the United States.
JonWarren1 JON WARREN, FORMER U.S. ARMY STAFF SERGEANT, OIF COMBAT VETERAN
Former Army Staff Sergeant Jon Warren is intimately familiar with the devastating physical and mental injuries of warfare. He now works helping veterans recover from wounds of their own. Warren, a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom, survived five IED blasts and was awarded two purple hearts for his injuries. Upon returning home from war, Jon suffered with PTSD and traumatic brain injury. He tried a battery of counseling approaches and pharmaceutical drugs and earned a psychology degree in hopes of finding a way to heal himself and help other veterans affected by PTSD. The LA Times profiled his struggles in a special report, “Healing Sgt. Warren,” in October 2013, as Warren underwent new virtual-reality treatments at the Brain Treatment Center in Newport Beach, Calif. The resulting sharp reduction in his PTSD symptoms was so life-changing that, today, Warren works for the Brain Treatment Center. He plays an instrumental role in managing its efforts to help Veterans in need.
Scott Stephenson Pic SCOTT STEPHENSON, FORMER U.S. ARMY SERGEANT, OIF COMBAT VETERAN
Scott Stephenson enlisted in the Army in October 2004 and was medically retired in April 2009. Scott was deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, where he suffered devastating injuries after a catastrophic IED attack. Stephenson suffered third degree burns over 66% of his body, lost most use of his left arm, and left leg amputation. Stephenson persevered through 3 years of hospitalization and 65 surgeries. In addition to his physical injuries, Stephenson also endured psychological trauma in the form of post traumatic stress disorder. Stephenson attempted a variety of treatment modalities for his PTSD symptoms, to include a 6-month inpatient program. Stephenson ultimately found relief from his PTSD at the Brain Treatment Center in Newport Beach, CA. Stephenson now works with the Brain Treatment Center to inspire and help other veterans find relief from PTSD.